Campaign video promo at Middlesex University


Above is a video promo I made to highlight the development of skills and experience gained by students during the campaign section of Introduction to Media and Society module at Middlesex University. As part of my new role as module leader , I revamped the content and introduced two new partnership organisations the campaign planning section of the module so that students would have experience of working with ‘real’ clients. A briefs were set by the organisations, Allia and Friends of the Earth to produce awareness campaigns. The project lasted 10 weeks and during this period students presented twice to the client, first as a pitch in early February and then presented their campaign proposals at the end of March. Feedback from students was very positive, particularly among Advertising, PR and Media students.

Rescued: Snub TV titles – Series 3 1991

I recently rescued the Snub TV titles, which I’d worked on with the prolific graphic and record sleeve designer, Vaughan Oliver, from a ropey VHS tape found in the dark recesses of my attic. Back in the late 1980s, early 1990s I worked as a motion graphic designer for a company that provided digital compositing facilities; a much sought after service in the early days of digitally produced graphics. Consequentially, the company was very popular with print and album covers designers.

SnubGrab1One of the heavy users was Vaughan Oliver, who produced some of the most inspired, distinctive and striking album art of the period through his company V23. A large portion of album covers were commissioned by 4AD, one of UKs most exciting and experimental record companies. I was an admirer of his work and his creativity. I also enjoyed the music contained on the discs inside the covers he designed too, particularly music produced by bands such as Pixies and the Cocteau Twins.

Continue reading

Publication: Self-created digital content sharing in retirement

Today a book arrived, Media, Margins and Popular Culture, with the second publication from my PhD. My article relates to statistics showing that the retired population in the United Kingdom is rising and growth in the use of digital technologies and the internet are also increasing within this age group. However, a polarised view of this age range has emerged as either a ‘tech-savvy’ ‘silver surfer’ web user or a fearful, ‘digitally dismissive’ reticent nonuser. This suggests an oversimplified perception of the over-65s, a section of society often ignored in qualitative internet research, and overlooks growing numbers who are using digital technology and the internet for something more than to search and consume online goods and materials. Continue reading

Presentation: The problem with ‘digital generation’: A study of adult digital content creators

I recently gave a presentation at the 2015 Generations themed MeCSSA conference at Northumbria University in Newcastle. What follows is outline and slide presentation.

Karl Mannheim (1952 [1928]) wrote about problems associated with use of the term ‘generation’. He argued that generational consciousness within a generation is not necessarily homogeneous or coherent, as there will be divergent views and practices within any group. Indeed one of the main criticisms arising from comparisons and differentiation between people in pre-defined generational groups is that standardised assumptions and pre-conceptions are made about how they behave and their ability to learn. This is particularly problematic in the digital era when use of the terms ‘digital generation’ and ‘net generation’ (Tapscott, 2008) are used for the categorisation of age delineation (Buckingham, 2006). Continue reading